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Renewable Energy Solutions for Green Chemistry > Energy Infrastructure > Solar thermal

Solar Thermal Blythe Solar Power Project to Generate 1,000MW in Mojave Desert

Blythe Solar Power Project in the Mojave desert will be the largest solar thermal installation on public lands.

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US Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar yesterday approved the construction of the world’s largest concentrated solar power plant with an overall capacity of 1,000MW. in the Mojave desert near Blythe, California.

The 7,025-acre Blythe Solar Power Project will nearly double the country’s solar power output and will power around 300,000 homes, besides saving save one million tons of carbon dioxide per year, it is claimed.

It is the first approval by the US Department of the Interior for a parabolic trough power plant on US public land.
“The Blythe Solar Power Project is a major milestone in our nation’s renewable energy economy and shows that the United States intends to compete and lead in the technologies of the future,” said Ken Salazar.

Solar Millennium will be in charge of developing the project and has signed a purchase agreement with Southern California Edison (SEC) back in July.

The Blythe Solar Power Project is a concentrated solar thermal electric generating facility with four adjacent, independent, and identical solar plants of 250 megawatt (MW) nominal capacity each for a total capacity of about 1,000 MW nominal.

The project would use solar parabolic trough technology to generate electricity. With this technology, arrays of parabolic mirrors collect heat energy from the sun and refocus the radiation on a receiver tube located at the focal point of the parabola. A heat transfer fluid (HTF) is heated to high temperature (750°F) as it circulates through the receiver tubes. The heated HTF is then piped through a series of heat exchangers where it releases its stored heat to generate high pressure steam. The steam is then fed to a traditional steam turbine generator where electricity is produced

The California Energy Commission is the lead agency (for licensing thermal power plants 50 megawatts and larger) under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and has a certified regulatory program under CEQA. Under its certified program, the Energy Commission is exempt from having to prepare an environmental impact report. Its certified program, however, does require environmental analysis of the project, including an analysis of alternatives and mitigation measures to minimize any significant adverse effect the project may have on the environment

Construction

Construction of the $6 billion plant is expected to start at the end of 2010 with production estimated to start in 2013. Solar Millenium says the construction phase will generate 1,066 jobs while the plant will employ 295 people permanently.

In terms of environmental impact, the project has caused concerns over the impact it will have on local wildlife. The Mojave Desert is home to the threatened desert tortoise, bighorn sheep and other animals. Other projects in the region have met with fiercer resistance over suchconcerns.

Projected solar power growth

Concomitant to this announcement, Bloomberg New Energy Finance issued a report saying that solar may meet 4.2 per cent of American electricity supplies by 2020 thanks to lower costs that make investments more attractive. Cost of thermal and photovoltaic has fallen to less than $200 per megawatt-hour.

The report estimates that $100 billion in investment over the next decade would increase capacity from 1,400MW today to 44,000MW.

Commercial use of solar power will account for half of the installation, with the rest split between residential rooftops and utility scale plants.

The report also estimates that solar will be powering 2.4 per cent of households by 2020.

Solar Thermal Troughs

parabolic solar thermal troughs


Edited by Carolyn Allen, Managing Editor of Solutions For Green

Publication Date: 10/28/2010
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